Monthly Archives: October 2020

McDowell Sonoran Conservancy Provides Insight for White Tank Mountains Conservancy’s Connectivity Initiative

Large, connected landscapes are critical for wildlife. Maintaining these connected open spaces can be challenging, especially in areas experiencing rapid urbanization. Can we protect wildlife while also meeting the desires of people? McDowell Sonoran Conservancy, in partnership with the City of Scottsdale and other entities, has long considered this a top priority. McDowell Sonoran Preserve

2020-10-30T13:57:09-07:00October 30th, 2020|Featured News, News, Science|

White-nose Syndrome: A Deadly Disease for Bats

By Marianne Moore, Ph.D., Arizona State University assistant professor Originally published in the Fall 2017 Edition of Mountain Lines Around Valentine’s Day 2007, a phone call from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to my Ph.D. advisor at Boston University, Dr. Tom Kunz, alerted us to unusual bat mortality occurring in New York

Going Batty at Dixie Mine

By Debbie Langenfeld, McDowell Sonoran Conservancy Parson's Field Institute certified citizen scientist Originally published in the Fall 2017 issue of Mountain Lines Photos by Dwight Keller. It’s a hot summer night and the bats in the Dixie Mine wait for sunset to leave their cavern for their nightly excursion in search of an evening meal.

Bats Mean a Healthy Ecosystem

By Ronald Mixan and Joel Diamond, Arizona Game and Fish Department Originally published in the Spring 2018 Edition of Mountain Lines Photo Credits to George Andrejko and Ronald Mixan, Arizona Game and Fish Department Arizona provides habitat for 28 bat species. This diversity is second only to Texas and represents the highest endemism of any

Myths and Mysteries of the McDowells

by Len Marcisz, McDowell Sonoran Conservancy Legacy steward Originally published in the Fall 2020 edition of Mountain Lines The McDowell Mountains are not the most famous mountains in Arizona, nor even in Maricopa County, where the Superstitions and their associated legend of the Lost Dutchman Mine draw international curiosity. But mountains, like people, don’t need

American Midlands Naturalist publishes Conservancy manuscript

American Midlands Naturalist today published the Conservancy manuscript, Lessons Learned 5+ Years After Transplanting and Seeding Restoration Sites in the Sonoran Desert, U.S.A. Helen I. Rowe, Tiffany A. Sprague, Jennifer Broatch, Dan Gruber, Debbie Langenfeld, Lisa Rivera Read the manuscript here.

2020-10-22T11:13:07-07:00October 22nd, 2020|Latest Mentions, News, Press, Science|

Let’s Ride the Preserve Backcountry

Originally published in the Spring 2018 Edition of Mountain Lines.  You can find all of the issues of Mountain Lines available for online viewing or download here. By Art Ranz, McDowell Sonoran Conservancy master steward So often when I am working as a trail guide at the Brown’s Ranch Trailhead, I am asked about trails

2020-10-12T11:08:04-07:00October 12th, 2020|Bike, Visiting|

Fast Facts About the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy

The McDowell Sonoran Conservancy preserves and advances natural open space through science, education and stewardship. Our vision is a culture that ensures, preserves and values natural open spaces for all to enjoy. With more than 30,500 acres protected in Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve, we are stewards of the largest urban Preserve in the country.

2020-10-06T13:44:07-07:00October 6th, 2020|Uncategorized|

Nature As Therapy

Toni Vallee, Master steward McDowell Sonoran Conservancy, and Katy Lindberg RNC/COGNP, Lead steward McDowell Sonoran Conservancy Frazzled by the COVID-19 pandemic? Getting casita fever (but not from the virus)? There are proven ways to improve your physical and mental health during difficult times or everyday

2020-10-05T14:38:20-07:00October 5th, 2020|Featured News, News, Visiting|
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