Mountain Lines – Spring 2022

Our Spring 2022 Mountain Lines, magazine of the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy, is available now. Check out our web edition to learn about identifying wildflowers, protecting the desert tortoise, getting started with mountain biking, getting along with our wild neighbors, education and partnering for the future, and so much more.

2022-04-01T06:27:59-07:00April 1st, 2022|Mountain Lines, News|

Mountain Lines – Winter 2022

Our Winter 2022 Mountain Lines, magazine of the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy, is available now. Check out our web edition to learn about Camino Campana Grand Opening, Climbing Rocks in the McDowells, Monsoons Get Things Hopping, Butterflies, Butterflies, and More Butterflies, and so much more.

2022-04-01T06:27:42-07:00December 30th, 2021|Mountain Lines, News|

Mountain Lines – Fall 2021

Our Fall 2021 Mountain Lines, magazine of the McDowell Sonoran Conservancy, is available now. Check out our web edition to learn about AZH2O, Water and the Human History of the McDowell Mountains, New Pima Dynamite Trailhead, Results of a Trail Restoration Study, Revising the Conservancy's Approach to Education, and so much more.

2021-10-01T10:21:25-07:00October 1st, 2021|Mountain Lines, News|

White-nose Syndrome: A Deadly Disease for Bats

By Marianne Moore, Ph.D., Arizona State University assistant professor Originally published in the Fall 2017 Edition of Mountain Lines Around Valentine’s Day 2007, a phone call from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to my Ph.D. advisor at Boston University, Dr. Tom Kunz, alerted us to unusual bat mortality occurring in New York

Bats Mean a Healthy Ecosystem

By Ronald Mixan and Joel Diamond, Arizona Game and Fish Department Originally published in the Spring 2018 Edition of Mountain Lines Photo Credits to George Andrejko and Ronald Mixan, Arizona Game and Fish Department Arizona provides habitat for 28 bat species. This diversity is second only to Texas and represents the highest endemism of any

Myths and Mysteries of the McDowells

by Len Marcisz, McDowell Sonoran Conservancy Legacy steward Originally published in the Fall 2020 edition of Mountain Lines The McDowell Mountains are not the most famous mountains in Arizona, nor even in Maricopa County, where the Superstitions and their associated legend of the Lost Dutchman Mine draw international curiosity. But mountains, like people, don’t need

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